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Welcome to the XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre

Notice
Due to a planned migration of the XMM-Newton SOC web portal, all SOC internet services (including ToO Alerts) will be unavailable Wednesday, 10 February from 10:00 to 13:00 (GMT).



XMM-Newton Essentials
The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.

Since Earth's atmosphere blocks out all X-rays, only a telescope in space can detect and study celestial X-ray sources. The XMM-Newton mission is helping scientists to solve a number of cosmic mysteries, ranging from the enigmatic black holes to the origins of the Universe itself. Observing time on XMM-Newton is being made available to the scientific community, applying for observational periods on a competitive basis.

Read more about the spacecraft, mirrors and instruments and about the XMM-Newton SOC.


News and Highlights


Winds from Spiral Galaxy A Milky Way twin swept by an ultra-fast X-ray wind, 14-Jan-2016
ESA's XMM-Newton has found a wind of high-speed gas streaming from the centre of a bright spiral galaxy like our own that may be reducing its ability to produce new stars.
Further details on ESA's Space Science pages.

Stephan's Quintet Sparkling Stephan's Quintet, 21-Dec-2015
The Stephan's Quintet of galaxies was discovered by astronomer Édouard Stephan in 1877. At the time, however, he reported the discovery of 'new nebulae', as the concept of other galaxies beyond our Milky Way was only formalised in the 1920s.
Further details on ESA's Space in Images pages.

Black Hole NuSTAR Finds Cosmic Clumpy Doughnut Around Black Hole, 17-Dec-2015
The most massive black holes in the universe are often encircled by thick, doughnut-shaped disks of gas and dust. This deep-space doughnut material ultimately feeds and nourishes the growing black holes tucked inside.
Further details on NASA's web portal.

Galaxy Clusters Unravelling the Cosmic Web: Survey gives insights into Universe's structure, 15-Dec-2015
Today marks the release of the first papers to result from the XXL survey, the largest survey of galaxy clusters ever undertaken with ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory.
Further details on ESA's Science & Technology pages.

Galaxy Clusters XXL Hunt for Galaxy Clusters, 15-Dec-2015
ESO telescopes have provided an international team of astronomers with the gift of the third dimension in a plus-sized hunt for the largest gravitationally bound structures in the Universe — galaxy clusters. Observations by the VLT and the NTT complement those from other observatories across the globe and in space as part of the XXL survey — one of the largest ever such quests for clusters.
Further details on ESO's web portal.

Lockman Hole The Lockman Hole in X-rays, 14-Dec-2015
A special patch of sky can be found close to the Big Dipper, in the northern constellation of Ursa Major, also known as the Great Bear. Appearing to contain no stars and hardly any gas clouds from our Milky Way galaxy, this region is called the Lockman Hole.
Further details on ESA's Space in Images pages.

Black Hole A new technique to gauge the distant Universe, 03-Dec-2015
Scientists have developed a technique to use quasars – powerful sources driven by supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies – to study the Universe's history and composition.
Further details on ESA's Science & Technology pages.

Galaxy Cluster Cosmic filaments exposed near huge cluster, 02-Dec-2015
ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray observatory has revealed three massive filaments of hot gas flowing towards a cluster of galaxies, uncovering a portion of the cosmic skeleton that pervades the entire Universe.
Further details on ESA's Science & Technology pages.

Black Hole Black hole caught feasting on a star, 21-Oct-2015
Astronomers have detected the last 'cry' from a star that passed too close to the central black hole of its host galaxy and was being destroyed and 'swallowed' – a phenomenon known as a tidal disruption event. The study, based on the observations of X-rays emitted by leftover material from the star in the vicinity of the black hole, allowed the astronomers to measure, for the first time, the physical properties of a newly formed accretion disc, enabling them to investigate the initial phases of such a powerful event.
Further details on ESA's Science & Technology pages.

Today's Revolution

Refereed Papers
4357

Current Target
3CR33.2

Events
Workshop: "XMM-Newton: The Next Decade"
9 - 11 May 2016

Abstract Submission deadline:
29th of February
Registration deadline:
14th of April

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This page was last updated on 5 February, 2016.